On sticking your head in the sand

I don’t usually watch the news.

There’s too much suffering, heartache and pain for me to handle. As one of life’s feelers, I know that watching human suffering on the news and reading it online impacts me intensely and affects me to the core.

For the most part, I’m quite happy to stick my head in the sand and potter along in my own merry little world.

There is one major news event that I haven’t been able to ignore recently though. It’s the story of asylum seeker baby Asha.

As I was driving in a lovely air-conditioned car to South Bank in Brisbane last Saturday afternoon, all dolled up ready to meet friends for drinks, I witnessed groups of protesters outside the Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital.

‘What are those people doing?’ one of the girls had asked me as we pulled up at the traffic lights opposite the protesters.

I remained silent as I read the protester’s signs ashamed that I had no idea what was going on. Ashamed that I didn’t have an intelligent answer, any answer, for my girls.

‘Let them stay,’ read the signs. ‘Free the refugees,’ said others. ‘Refugees are people’. ‘Don’t let them go back to hell’.

A quick google search unveiled that a one-year-old girl, Asha, was at the centre of a refugee rights row.

While in a detention centre in Nauru, Asha sustained burns to her body and was transported to Lady Cilento Hospital in Brisbane for treatment. Doctors at the hospital refused to release her to immigration authorities until a suitable home environment was identified, that is, not back to detention in Nauru.

Since witnessing the protesters fight for baby Asha in the middle of a blisteringly hot day, I’ve become obsessed with all news relating to this story and asylum seekers on Nauru.

I have not been able to stop thinking about what this poor family must be going through. As a mother I can’t help but wonder and worry what baby Asha’s mother is feeling. Seeing your child experience pain is one thing, but to then be faced with an uncertain future is another. She must be terrified of what will happen to her child and family, living in fear of being taken from the hospital and deported back to detention in Nauru.

Baby Asha and her family were released yesterday to community detention within Australia, but for how long? I cannot begin to understand how it must feel to be so uncertain of your family’s fate.

I have friends and parents of friends who have escaped war torn countries and let me tell you their decision to seek asylum was not made lightly and not without massive risk.

Can you imagine how desperate the situation of these asylum seekers must be in order for them to risk their lives in the hope to build a better life for themselves and their families?

These people are no different to us and yet we struggle to recognise that. We were just fortunate enough to be raised in one of the lucky countries.

It’s all too easy to put on the blinkers and to not see and not want to see what is happening outside our own little world.

I will continue to follow Baby Asha’s story and keep her and her family in my prayers along with all of the other asylum seekers facing their own battles.

I don’t attempt to know what the answer is for the asylum seekers and for Australia. I simply know that surely there is more we can do to help.

Do you watch the news regularly or do you tend to stick your head in the sand?

Linking up today with Essentially Jess for IBOT.

32 comments on On sticking your head in the sand

  1. Bec Senyard
    February 23, 2016 at 7:11 am (2 years ago)

    I agree that we can do more for these people. What if the tables were turned and we were the ones running from our own country? I will be praying for Asha too and I continually pray for families that are in hell, living on the borders of Turkey or wherever they have ended up just to get away from the violence and war. x

    Reply
  2. Amy @ HandbagMafia
    February 23, 2016 at 7:23 am (2 years ago)

    They haven’t been released as promised. They are being held somewhere apparently. The minister won’t say where. The govt has done the dirty. I am so ashamed to be Australian in this instance. We can and should be doing so much better. We are breaking international law and torturing people. It’s a national disgrace. I ca see why people don’t want to know- it’s heartbreaking.

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:04 am (2 years ago)

      Thank you for giving me the correct information, Amy. It certainly is a disgrace. My heart bleeds for these people.

      Reply
  3. Emily M Morgan
    February 23, 2016 at 8:52 am (2 years ago)

    It makes me so sad that with community protest, this little girl and her family are safe – so the government clearly is willing to listen to the people. And yet, all the hundreds of other children and suffering adults are still locked away in hell. The government won’t get them out – it’s so hypocritical. I’m so happy for Asha and her family but my heart breaks for all the others left behind.

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:09 am (2 years ago)

      Yes mine too, Emily. It’s a grave situation indeed and more needs to be done.

      Reply
  4. Andrew
    February 23, 2016 at 9:13 am (2 years ago)

    Thank you, my friend, for raising this important issue… Another voice heard, another step taken. Nauru itself is not a living hell, it’s a lovely nation with beaut people, however, the policy the Govt continues to enforce in the name of “stopping the boats” makes it so (at a high price to the tax payer and for not that many people).

    Every voice heard – including yours – will lead to change. xx

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:11 am (2 years ago)

      Thanks darling. Thank you for your insight and for everything you do for these people x

      Reply
  5. Emily
    February 23, 2016 at 9:34 am (2 years ago)

    I follow most stories but must admit that recently, sticking my head in the sand has been really, REALLY tempting. I’m glad Asha hasn’t been returned to Nauru. But YET. YET. I have zero doubt that Dutton is just waiting for the press to back off and everyone to move on before they go back.
    And some of the comments about it. “When the families at Nauru hear that they get to stay, they’ll all boil their kettles and call for their children.” SERIOUSLY?! People really seem to think not that these refugees are feeling persecution, but that they sat around some foreign dinner table together one night and made the reasoned, calculated decision to come to Australia because STRAYA IS THE BEST, MATE. Does my head in.
    Sorry for the rant. Beautiful post. x

    Reply
    • Emily
      February 23, 2016 at 9:34 am (2 years ago)

      Fleeing, not feeling. Although I’m sure they’re still feeling it. x

      Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:12 am (2 years ago)

      I love your rant, Em. I couldn’t agree more x

      Reply
  6. Raychael aka Mystery Case
    February 23, 2016 at 10:12 am (2 years ago)

    I don’t watch TV, so unless I go looking for news online or something is trending on social media, I tend to miss a lot. I wouldn’t say I stick my head in the sand, just life is pretty overwhelming right now, so I to tend to avoid the news feeds.

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:13 am (2 years ago)

      I can totally get that, Raychael. There’s just not enough hours in the day.

      Reply
  7. Bec @ Seeing the Lighter Side
    February 23, 2016 at 10:44 am (2 years ago)

    Same. I understand the arguments of ‘setting an example’ but these are real people with real lives and our policies are destroying them. What kind of an example is that to ourselves and our children?

    Reply
  8. Sammie @ The Annoyed Thryoid
    February 23, 2016 at 10:54 am (2 years ago)

    I stick my head in the sand but I keep my ears open, if that makes sense. My head and my heart hurts when I think about the refugees and their suffering. I can’t change the situation, globally or nationlly but I can make a positive difference in my community. I volunteer at my local Asylum Seekers Resource Centre and while it’s no magic wand, I’m hoping it that it can make a big difference to a small group of people. We all have to start somewhere, right?!

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:15 am (2 years ago)

      That’s exactly right, Sammie. Good on you for playing your part in making a difference. From little things big things grow.

      Reply
  9. Haidee@Maybe Baby Brothers
    February 23, 2016 at 11:58 am (2 years ago)

    I hadn’t heard about this, it may not have made as much of a ripple in NZ media. I don’t watch the news unless something significant has happened that interests me but I do read it every day and tend to avoid some stories as they make me too emotional and like you, I can be haunted by it for days if it tugs at my heartstrings. Anything to do with animals and kids really gets to me. #TeamIBOT

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:16 am (2 years ago)

      I’m the same, Haidee. If anything is too happy or exciting, I tend to cry too. I have no hope 🙂

      Reply
  10. Sare
    February 23, 2016 at 4:33 pm (2 years ago)

    I do watch the news most days. I believe very little of what the media put forward. As an example, last night one of the main stations was talking about the Police ‘shoot to kill’ policy. I know that such a policy does not exist. It is simply media whipping up a storm to get viewers.
    I feel the media put their own spin on things and tell half truths. They put forward the information they to tell us and withhold other elements.
    I agree that it’s sad that the world is not peaceful and there are people that need to leave their home countries. I also don’t think the media are telling us the truth about the situation with baby Asha. I am sure there is more to the story we don’t know.
    So yes, I watch the news however think it is biased.

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:17 am (2 years ago)

      Yes, I agree, Sare. It’s hard to know what to believe. I can’t believe they’re talking about a shoot to kill policy when that policy doesn’t even exist. Where did honest reporting go?

      Reply
  11. Natalie @ our parallel connection
    February 23, 2016 at 5:04 pm (2 years ago)

    I love the news and especially catch up,on weekends when life allows me to take a breath or 2. There are so many sad stories out there and it all comes down to who we can actually help.

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      February 24, 2016 at 6:18 am (2 years ago)

      It does, Natalie. There needs to be more education around what we can do. What we think is only small could actually make a big difference in these people’s lives.

      Reply
  12. Jo @ You had us at hello
    February 24, 2016 at 1:59 pm (2 years ago)

    I try not to watch the news but when I do it’s always so sad. When I travelled for 3 or more years I didn’t listen to the news once – just got on with it and had fun without a care in the world! Perhaps tats the best way to be 🙂

    Reply
  13. beck @crsftypjmum
    February 24, 2016 at 3:56 pm (2 years ago)

    I agree, I hardly watch the news either. It’s just to heartbreaking most days x

    Reply
  14. EssentiallyJess
    February 25, 2016 at 9:22 am (2 years ago)

    it’s just awful isn’t it? I wish there was some easy solution. I’m sure there must be but we just haven’t found it yet.

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      March 2, 2016 at 6:26 am (2 years ago)

      We just have to keep trying and stay positive.

      Reply
  15. Nicole@ The Builders Wife
    February 25, 2016 at 10:22 am (2 years ago)

    I am a little ashamed to admit, I am a bit of a head in the sand type. I find I have enough trouble dealing with the issues within my family and friend group, and tend to try and avoid adding to my load. Certainly not a great attribute, but at the moment, I have to find a balance for me. xx

    Reply
    • mummywifeme
      mummywifeme
      March 2, 2016 at 6:27 am (2 years ago)

      Yes, well said, Nicole. I feel exactly the same. I feel that I can’t add any more emotional distress to myself at this time in my life x

      Reply

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